In May 2011, after four years of life on McNutt's Island, we moved to Montreal. This blog remains, though, as a (sort of) daily record of our time on the island, and a winding path for anyone who would like to meander about among its magical places. For additional perspectives and insights I recommend Greg's book, Island Year: Finding Nova Scotia (2010), and my Bowl of Light (2012). I'll continue to post once in a while. If you do want to read this blog, one option would be to begin at the beginning of it (which is, as we all know, in blog-world, at the end), and read forward, concluding with the most recent entry. It's a journal, really, so it does makes more sense if you read it that way. But, you know, read it any way you like.

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

sleeping beauty

Here are pictures of our house before we bought it.I think it had always been painted red with white trim.
The yard looks nicely mowed even back then, when nobody was living here. We still have the same mowing crew. We had to take down the two chimneys. They were unsafe, but they were so beautiful, and I hated losing them. We used the old brick to make a walk along the side of the house.
You can see why we fell in love with it.

6 comments:

Janet said...

Thank you for sharing these great pictures with us - as I was saying the other day, this house was my dream house when I saw it on the realtor's website!

Piecefulafternoon said...

Charming - it is wonderful that you are taking such good care of the place now.

Kim said...

I can indeed see why you fell in love with it!

Karen said...

Oh, I've fallen in love with it too. Thanks for sharing the photos!...

And darn it, your blog still doesn't update on my blogroll for some reason, I forget to check for new posts sometimes. Glad I saw this one.

lynnekovan.com said...

I've fallen in love with your house! We are thinking of retiring to Nova Scotia from the UK, as I was born there. Your house is the sort of dream I have been having!

Terry J. Deveau said...

The rust-red-brown coloured paint could be made locally, by mixing red ochre and seal oil (or similar oil). Red ochre isn't too hard to find in many parts of Nova Scotia. A spring near Chester used to be called "Paint Spring", presumably for red ochre occurring there.